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Enough to go around

A Christian Science perspective.

By Jessica Lane / February 4, 2010



Shortly after moving to California, I discovered a stray male cat in my neighborhood. It was clear that no one was taking care of him, so I put cat food outside my door and kept an eye on him. I named him Spencer.

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Returning home one day after a few weeks of this, I noticed him standing on the sidewalk, eyes fixed on the food bowl, body poised for a fight. The object of his gaze: another cat eating from the bowl.

The two cats saw only one bowl of food – and were ready to go to battle over it. What their limited perspective did not afford them was an understanding of where the food came from. Spencer didn’t know that the food in the bowl was only a small portion of the large bag of food I had in the kitchen, and the even larger supply at the grocery store where I regularly replenished our provisions. Even more important, I was happy to provide food for both cats.

What a disparity of perspectives! The image of two cats ready to fight each other, juxtaposed with my desire to help both of them, helped me glimpse how sometimes we think we need to fight over limited supplies, when God has an entirely different view. He has an infinite storehouse of good from which He provides for each of our needs. He loves us all equally. We don’t always see the full source of His supply, but it’s there. And because He loves each of us, He ensures provision for all of us.

Yet how often do we believe that other people are more blessed than we are? How many times do we see only the supply we have in the present, to the extent that we can’t fathom the great source of good beyond our immediate experience? Maybe we think there is only one job opening and we have to fight our colleagues to get it. Or we’re tempted to think that if our bid on a home purchase or rental lease is not accepted, we’ll never find another home as good as that one.

However, just because we can’t see into the kitchen – the source of our supply – doesn’t mean that it isn’t there. Similarly, just because we’re not aware of God’s great love doesn’t mean that He loves each of us any less.

As Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the Monitor, wrote, “God gives you His spiritual ideas, and in turn, they give you daily supplies. Never ask for to-morrow: it is enough that divine Love is an ever-present help; and if you wait, never doubting, you will have all you need every moment” (“Miscellaneous Writings 1883–1896,” p. 307).

The good in our lives is from God and is sourced from His infinite supply. We need to lift our thought above mortal experience and turn to God’s infinite love, in order to bring that supply more fully into our lives. As St. Paul wrote, “My God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus” (Phil. 4:19).

God’s love for His beloved children is boundless. Because He loves each of us dearly, He watches over us and ensures we have what we need. When the supply is infinite, there is nothing to fight over.

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