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Are you a space whiz? Take our quiz!

How much do you know about astronauts, meteorites, planets, stars, and galaxies?

2. Which planet has the fewest moons?

Mercury and Venus have no moons, mostly likely because of their small size -- it takes a lot of mass to hold a moon. Venus is almost as large as Earth, but we probably got our moon from a collision with a Mars-sized object early in our solar system's history. The debris from the crash settled into the moon. The same thing could have happened to Venus or Mercury, but if it did, the resulting debris either drifted away or was tugged into the sun. Mars's moons are stolen asteroids, captured from the Asteroid Belt -- a ring of space rocks and dwarf moons between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

Mercury and Venus have no moons, mostly likely because of their small size -- it takes a lot of mass to hold a moon. Venus is almost as large as Earth, but we probably got our moon from a collision with a Mars-sized object early in our solar system's history. The debris from the crash settled into the moon. The same thing could have happened to Venus or Mercury, but if it did, the resulting debris either drifted away or was tugged into the sun. Mars's moons are stolen asteroids, captured from the Asteroid Belt -- a ring of space rocks and dwarf moons between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

Mercury and Venus have no moons, mostly likely because of their small size -- it takes a lot of mass to hold a moon. Venus is almost as large as Earth, but we probably got our moon from a collision with a Mars-sized object early in our solar system's history. The debris from the crash settled into the moon. The same thing could have happened to Venus or Mercury, but if it did, the resulting debris either drifted away or was tugged into the sun. Mars's moons are stolen asteroids, captured from the Asteroid Belt -- a ring of space rocks and dwarf moons between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

Mercury and Venus have no moons, mostly likely because of their small size -- it takes a lot of mass to hold a moon. Venus is almost as large as Earth, but we probably got our moon from a collision with a Mars-sized object early in our solar system's history. The debris from the crash settled into the moon. The same thing could have happened to Venus or Mercury, but if it did, the resulting debris either drifted away or was tugged into the sun. Mars's moons are stolen asteroids, captured from the Asteroid Belt -- a ring of space rocks and dwarf moons between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.

NASA/AP/File
(Read caption)

Saturn

 

Venus

 

Mars

 

Jupiter

 
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