USA Oklahoma City beheading: Will jihad-style attack boost 'bring gun to work' laws? (+video)

The Vaughan Foods officer who used his gun to stop a beheading attack by a fired employee is protected by a controversial law affirming the right to bring firearms to work. Twenty-two states have followed Oklahoma’s lead.

By , Staff writer

Steve Sisney/The Oklahoman/AP

Vaughan Foods Chief Operating Officer Mark Vaughan, a reserve sheriff's deputy, used his personal handgun that he brings to work to stop a beheading attack by recently converted Muslim Alton Nolen on Friday in Oklahoma.