Star Trek: George Takei tweet boosts Solar Roadways

Star Trek: George Takei, who played Sulu on Star Trek, has more than 8 million social media followers. After Takei tweeted his approval Solar Roadways saw a boost in their crowdfunding campaign.

By , Associated Press

Each solar panel is loaded with technology including: microprocessors, LED's and a heating element that can melt ice and snow.

When the helmsman of the USS Enterprise likes your invention, you know you're on the road to success.

George Takei, who portrayed Sulu on "Star Trek" and has more than 8 million followers on social media, plugged a North Idaho couple's idea for transforming roads, sidewalks and parking lots into solar surfaces. The next day, Scott and Julie Brusaw saw their crowdfunding campaign pass the $1 million goal.

Takei learned about Solar Roadways of Sagle, Idaho, and tweeted Saturday: "I like the sound of that. Worth a look. Dare to dream, I say."

Recommended: Think you know the odd effects of global climate change? Take our quiz.

The Brusaws launched their Indiegogo online campaign April 21 to move their product toward manufacturing. They've received a flood of attention from news media, technology blogs and social media in the weeks since, and on Tuesday had raised more than $1.4 million from more than 33,000 contributors. That includes 73 who gave $1,000 each and seven who gave $10,000 each.

"Right after the campaign began there were so many people around the world wanting to help," said Bonners Ferry resident Barbara Russell, a volunteer working to draw attention to Solar Roadways. "It has been incredibly exciting, and there are so many intelligent and passionate people being brought together in conversation and support of this project."

One volunteer started a support team for the fundraising effort, while another made a video titled "Solar FREAKIN' Roadways!" that has been viewed more than 6?million times on YouTube.

The Brusaws believe their technology can transform U.S. highways and cityscapes into sprawling networks of energy generation and provide surfaces that are durable, safe and less expensive to maintain than concrete and asphalt.

The hexagon-shaped, inch-thick panels collect solar energy that can power heaters and lights under the glass, with electricity to spare. With a $750,000 grant from the Federal Highway Administration, the Brusaws built a small parking pad next to their workshop using 108 of the panels. The pad remained free of snow and ice throughout the winter.

The city of Sandpoint has applied for a federal grant to use the technology in a test project downtown, and the Brusaws hope to build a small manufacturing plant in Sandpoint within the year.

"We want the first projects to be right in our own backyard," Scott Brusaw, an electrical engineer, said in an April interview.

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Information from: The Spokesman-Review,

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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