Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


Energy Voices: Insights on the future of fuel and power

Pirates continue disruption of Niger Delta oil trade

Pirates generally target ships in order to steal the goods being transported, and oil trade around the Niger Delta is being affected as pirate activity grows, according to OilPrice.com. 

By James BurgessGuest blogger / October 20, 2012

This February 2010 file photo shows a crew of U.S. sailors and Nigerian special forces fighters prepares to board the NNS Burutu for a training exercise off the Nigerian coast. Most of the gangs operating around the Niger Delta have formed from the remains of the militant groups that plagued the area until an amnesty was agreed in 2009, according to OilPrice.com.

Jon Gambrell/AP/File

Enlarge

The Niger Delta is the heart of Africa’s oil industry, yet the Gulf of Guinea, the area in which the delta is situated, is a hot spot for piracy. Only in the waters off Somalia are pirate attacks more common.

Skip to next paragraph

offers extensive coverage of all energy sectors from crude oil and natural gas to solar energy and environmental issues. To see more opinion pieces and news analysis that cover energy technology, finance and trading, geopolitics, and sector news, please visit Oilprice.com.

Recent posts

Pirates generally target ships in order to steal the goods being transported, and oil trade in the region is being affected as pirate activity grows. (Related Article: Is a Larger Middle East War Inevitable?)

On Monday the French shipping company Bourbon, which supplies vessels to the offshore oil industry in the Niger Delta, announced that one of its ships had been taken by pirates and that seven people kidnapped; six Russians and an Estonian. Luckily the other nine crew members had managed to make their way to the safety of the Nigerian port of Onne. (Related Article: Piracy: Skulls, Cross-Bones and Letterhead

Back in August pirates attacked a Greek oil tanker off the coast of Togo. They released the tanker and crew of 20 just a few days later, having unloaded 3,000 tonnes of fuel.

Then just earlier this month pirates released another gasoline tanker that they had commandeered near to the Ivory Coast.

Most of the gangs operating around the Niger Delta have formed from the remains of the militant groups that plagued the area until an amnesty was agreed in 2009.

Source: http://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Pirates-Commandeer-Another-Oil-Tanker-Near-the-Niger-Delta.html

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best energy bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.

  • Weekly review of global news and ideas
  • Balanced, insightful and trustworthy
  • Subscribe in print or digital

Special Offer

 

Doing Good

 

What happens when ordinary people decide to pay it forward? Extraordinary change...

Danny Bent poses at the starting line of the Boston Marathon in Hopkinton, Mass.

After the Boston Marathon bombings, Danny Bent took on a cross-country challenge

The athlete-adventurer co-founded a relay run called One Run for Boston that started in Los Angeles and ended at the marathon finish line to raise funds for victims.

 
 
Become a fan! Follow us! Google+ YouTube See our feeds!