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A 'green' peek at America's largest coal plant

TV show 'Designing Spaces' looks at Prairie State Energy Campus, one of the most efficient and low emissions producing coal-fueled power plants in the US.

By Lisa Camooso MillerAmericas' Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE) / September 26, 2012

A pile of hard anthracite coal sits outside the D & D Anthracite Coal Co. mine, in this July 2003 file photo, in Good Spring, Pa. Prairie State Energy Campus is the largest coal-fueled power plant today.

Carolyn Kaster/AP/File

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Clean coal technology is constantly evolving. We’re continually making use of this natural resource more efficient. I recently had the opportunity to tour the Prairie State Energy Campus for Designing Spaces: Think Green.

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Vice President for Media Relations, American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity (ACCCE)

Lisa Camooso Miller is ACCCE's vice president for media relations. She oversees ACCCE's earned media implementation and strategic planning and appears regularly in print, radio and on national television. For more than 15 years, Lisa has been a notable communications leader in public affairs, holding key positions in local, state and federal government, political campaigns and committees, as well as advocacy organizations.

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The episode is centered around the latest technologies and developments the coal-based electricity industry has been using to make this plant one of the most efficient and low emissions producing coal-fueled power plants in the nation.

Prairie State Energy Campus is the largest coal-fueled power plant today. It produces more than 7 million tons of coal a year, with the plant’s first unit currently producing 800 megawatts of power.

Be sure to watch the segment here to learn more about Prairie State and clean coal technology.

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