Commentary The Monitor's View

  • Why Russians march: to replace 'campaigns of hate'

    A huge rally in Moscow in memory of slain dissident Boris Nemtsov also focused on state-run media's vilification of critics of Putin's policies. Demonization, either in Russia or by the West, must end to help solve issues like Ukraine.

  • When 'bystander intervention' works

    At the US military academies, students report a decline in unwanted sexual contact. One possible reason is new training in 'bystander intervention,' or preventing an assault when a person nearby speaks up or takes action. A Pentagon report adds legitimacy to 'good Samaritan' training at educational institutions.

  • Ukraine ceasefires: Why the mediators matter

    The latest attempt at a Ukraine ceasefire was mediated by the EU's top leaders. The first one was mediated by the 57-nation OSCE. These supranational bodies are a good answer to Russia's super-nationalism 

  • Finding 'the next big thing'

    As productivity slows, experts ask if an era of innovation is over. Has the digital revolution lost its juice? Optimists say invention only drives more invention.

  • In India, a clean sweep for honest governance

    An anticorruption party's big election victory in India's capital may reflect a popular mood in many of the world's fast-growing cities: Urban poor seek honesty in officials.

  • In praise of Africa's welcome mat

    Even as refugee crises escalate in Africa, many of its nations keep borders open for those fleeing war, Ebola, terror, weather, repression. They deserve praise as much as aid for this compassion.

  • Why tolerance of religion is not enough

    With millions fleeing religious-related violence, protection of peaceful religious expression requires active, evenhanded work by judges and elected officials. Free countries must set a model of cool, calm balancing of freedom of religion and compelling public needs. 

  • Behold Greeks bearing pledges of tax compliance

    Europe's future depends in large part on Greece's recovery, and in turn Greeks no longer avoiding taxes. A new government's pledge gives hope for a shift in civic virtue.

  • How to encircle Islamic State (+video)

    Acts of terror by Islamic State or related groups have evoked fear, flight, or fight. Some Muslims, Jews, and Christians seek an alternative response.

  • Wal-Mart's pay hike and the cycle of virtues

    The world's largest private employer plans a raise for its lowest-paid workers, a sign of a drive in many countries to hike wages to stimulate economies. Firms need to look beyond the bottom line in how they treat employees.

  • In court sentencing, beware data-driven 'risk' tools

    A trend in US courts and elsewhere to use analytical 'risk assessment' tools in determining a person's future dangerousness undercuts the notion of individual agency in choosing a moral and lawful life.

  • Turkey's protests by women: jihad of a different sort

    Huge protests in Turkey, on the streets and Twitter following a woman's murder, are aimed at violence against women. Yet they are also the biggest sign yet of Muslim women waging a struggle against ancient Islamic views.

More The Monitor's View
  • In India, a clean sweep for honest governance

    An anticorruption party's big election victory in India's capital may reflect a popular mood in many of the world's fast-growing cities: Urban poor seek honesty in officials.

  • Nigeria's ballots vs. Boko Haram's bullets (+video)

    A delay of the Nigerian presidential election is unfortunate but perhaps necessary to ensure a credible vote. An improved democracy is the best weapon against terrorists.

  • Learning to talk to enemies

    From Russia to Iran to Cuba, the US or its allies have engaged morally suspect regimes that are prone to abuse diplomatic negotiations. Any talks with adversaries must have a good prospect of success to be justified.

  • The very model of a modern Arab democracy

    Tunisia's newly formed elected government includes both Islamist and anti-Islamist parties. With much of the Arab world in turmoil, this model of tolerant pluralism needs to be the region's lodestar.

  • A new king's duty to young Saudis

    With a new monarch, Saudi Arabia must set a better example in reforms that appeal to disaffected young Muslims who may seek a purpose by fighting for Islamic State.

  • Sweet lures for China, Russia

    Despite aggression against their neighbors, China and Russia are being offered a place in regional trade unions. This honey of an offer requires a different view of them than simply as bullies.

  • Ukraine's war of the pews

    Russia's use of the Orthodox Church in its struggle over Ukraine has both divided churches in the war-town country and united them in seeking a common peace. They and the faithful, more than the fighting, may end this war.

  • Why beheading journalists backfires

    The Islamic State has now beheaded three journalists, the latest being Kenji Goto of Japan. His reports on the innocent in conflicts only highlights why groups like ISIL need a spotlight of journalistic truth on them.

  • Remodeling democracy, 800 years on

    Global surveys show rising distrust of traditional democracy, and many institutions. Yet other indicators suggest young people want different types of civic engagement. The media must probe beyond the politics of conflict.

  • Dousing China's puffing dragon

    China has launched a campaign for nonsmokers and against nicotine addiction. Despite a lack of enforcement of current smoking bans and the government's addiction to tobacco revenue, China might become a model for other countries.

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