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Commentary The Monitor's View

  • Feeding and clothing ourselves wisely

    Huge amounts of water, chemicals, and fuel are used to produce food and clothing. Finding new ways to make better use of what has already been grown or manufactured conserves these precious resources.

  • A jihadist’s cultural redemption

    A former leader in an Al Qaeda affiliate admits guilt – and regret – in a world court for destroying ancient artifacts in Timbuktu, Mali. His advice to jihadists: Save all of humanity’s cherished culture rather than destroy it.

  • Pulling kids from war’s rubble

    Global reaction to children in conflicts – as soldiers, refugees, or among the injured – has improved as more nations presume innocence for the youngest and most vulnerable.

  • A new approach to ending terrorism

    In a TV speech, Morocco’s king appeals to the millions of Moroccans living in the West to counter the false arguments of Islamic State that might appeal to disaffected young Muslims and lead them to violent acts.

August 24, 2016

Photos of the Day 8/24

A recovered hedgehog is held in gloved hands before its release near Kecskemet, Hungary, on Wednesday. Some forty previously injured and rehabilitated animals belonging to the protected species were released into the wild as a result of the joint efforts of the Kecskemet Zoo and Kiskunsag National Park.

More The Monitor's View
  • For Africa, a lesson about identity politics

    Voters in South Africa gave the ruling African National Congress a sharp rebuke for presuming it can be reelected as the natural leader of the black majority. The ANC must return to Nelson Mandela’s goal of a nonracial society with equal opportunities.

  • What’s not a game in Rio Olympics

    As host to the 2016 Games, Brazil hopes to both rebrand itself abroad and improve its own society. The Games remain a force for good, and each Olympics leaves its own legacy.

  • A leap for Japan’s women – and its economy

    Tokyo elected its first female governor, another sign of Japan’s slow progress to revive the economy by encouraging more women in the workplace.

  • Alabama can lead by rejecting a lottery

    As one of the few states without a lottery, Alabama may soon vote to start one as a revenue fix for a fiscal fiasco. Yet national data show lotteries are a tax on the poor. States can’t rely on faith in luck when they must invest in talent.

  • Britain’s answer to angry voters

    As in the US election campaign, British voters showed their dislike of globalization in opting out of the European Union. Now a new prime minister seeks to restore trust in globalization’s prime agents: corporations.

  • A Norway gift that would move mountains

    To honor Finland’s independence anniversary, Norway may give it a mountain peak along their border. The gift, while a small gesture, symbolizes a kind of peace that may keep land-grabbing bully nations at bay. 

  • The Fed’s search for breakout growth

    America’s central bank, like other big financial institutions, seeks fresh ideas to end the ‘new normal’ of mediocre economic growth. Breaking up old models is a good first step.

  • Islamic State’s failing ‘war of religion’

    After Islamic State claimed credit for the killing of a French Catholic priest, leaders of major faiths gathered to counter this attempt to incite Muslims and Christians against each other. Peace is the norm between religions.

  • Mercy for the corrupt who come clean?

    The US and Tunisia are each testing whether leniency toward individuals or businesses that are open about their corruption might lead to less corruption. Confession can be a shorter path to reconciliation.

  • Germany's response to mass violence

    Four recent attacks on the public, some with links to Islamic State, have raised fears but also calls not to allow fear to create an overreaction.

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