Readers Write: Vague definitions of income inequality; Our daughter's interview with Mary

Letters to the Editor for the February 24, 2014 weekly magazine: 

Without parameters for the term, how can one know if 'income inequality' has been eradicated?

Intuitively, the solution to income inequality is income equality. If that is not the goal, then there will always be income inequality – and the potential for class warfare.

An essay on meeting the Beatles reminds me of when our daughter Alice interviewed Mary Travers of the group Peter, Paul, and Mary, developing a relationship that lasted until Mary's death.

By , Monitor reader , Monitor reader

Vague definition of income inequality

Regarding the Jan. 13 Focus story "A tarnished American dream?" about growing concentration of US wealth: For years progressives have come up with flowery-sounding terms that have only vague meaning – "social justice," "economic justice," and now "income inequality." Without clear meaning, these terms have no parameters, and without parameters how can one know if social justice or economic justice has been attained or income inequality has been eradicated?

Intuitively, the solution to income inequality is income equality. If that is not the goal, then there will always be income inequality. The hardworking American taxpayer will be expected to pay higher taxes to fund programs to solve undefinable problems.

We've been told by President Obama and others: "The rich don't pay their fair share." But in my view, they don't adequately define "rich" or "fair share," so class warfare continues in perpetuity, which will make Karl Marx eternally happy.

Recommended: Are the rich getting richer? Take our quiz on inequality and incomes.

Albert Paparesta

Brookfield, Conn.

Our daughter's interview with Mary

In the Home Forum essay, "I meet the Beatles!," in the Feb. 3 issue, the writer recalls her gutsy move as a 13-year-old reporter to get an interview with the Beatles upon their arrival in Miami for "The Ed Sullivan Show" 50 years ago. The piece brought back a memory of the time our then-10-year-old daughter Alice was so determined to meet her idol, Mary Travers of the group Peter, Paul, and Mary, that she worked her way into a post-concert press conference in Cincinnati's Music Hall and got her interview.

Then she so charmed Ms. Travers that the two of them went to a coffee shop after the press conference and took us, her parents, along. They developed a relationship that lasted until Mary's death. We often still recall the sight of tall Mary and little Alice, now an attorney in Maryland, running hand in hand across a downtown street to the shop that evening.

Dr. Emil Dansker

Cincinnati

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