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Giving asylum to Syrian refugees, following Rwanda's example of great leadership, the feeling of isolation among Europe's Muslim youth, Korea's struggling start-up culture, Turkey must help fight Islamic State

This week's round-up of commentaries covers Syrian refugees, Rwandan President Paul Kagame's example of great leadership, the feeling of isolation among Muslim youth in Europe, Korea's struggling start-up culture, and why Turkey must help fight Islamic State. 

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    A Syrian Kurdish refugee woman with her daughter waits for transportation after crossing into Turkey from the Syrian border town Kobani, near the southeastern Turkish town of Suruc in Sanliurfa province October 2, 2014. More than 150,000 refugees have fled Kobani over the past two weeks alone, with a steady exodus continuing. Officials from Turkey's AFAD disaster management agency said some 4,000 crossed on Wednesday, and a similar figure the day before.
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The Star / Toronto
Giving asylum to Syrian refugees

“Some 3 million Syrians have fled [their country] ... in the most extreme such crisis in decades.... Happily, Canada and the U.S. have stepped up on the aid front. But as potential safe havens, we have yet to open our doors more than a crack...,” states an editorial. “It raises the question of ... whether we and our neighbour to the south have been so spooked by the 9/11 attacks and Mideast jihadism that we are now afraid to offer shelter to Syrian moms and toddlers.... Canadian community and refugee organizations are urging a program to resettle 10,000 Syrians in this country. That isn’t out of line, given the scale of Syria’s calamity and Canada’s traditional response to such crises. Syrians have been terrorized by [the regime of Bashar al-Assad] and the jihadists fighting it. Instead of screening them to death, we should hold out a hand of hope.”

The Punch / Lagos, Nigeria
Rwanda’s leaders set an example for the rest of Africa

“It is remarkable how the Rwandan president, Paul Kagame, has managed to transform his country after one of the worst genocides that the world has ever known...,” writes Emmanuel Nwachukwu. “Kagame gives the rest of us hope that Africa is not cursed.... It is possible to transform our countries if the will is there at the very top of government.... Commentators say that selfless leadership and a disciplined approach are at the centre of Kagame’s vision to create an orderly and efficiently run society in Rwanda where things work. [Nigeria is] ... still a great nation with huge potential, but like Rwanda, we must find our own way of realising these potentials.”

EU Observer / Brussels
Feeling of isolation among Muslim youth in Europe

“British citizens were shocked by the news that American [journalists were] executed by a terrorist with a London accent. The question arises: how is it possible that a person, who had grown up in freedom and democracy, joined the side endorsing a hateful Islamic ideology?... The main causes are frustration and a feeling of alienation,” writes Tomas Zdechovsky. “People coming from Muslim countries and young second or third generation Muslims are frustrated by the on-looker stance of European countries when it comes to Syria’s civil war. This is complemented by the feeling of alienation at home, as they are often torn between the culture their older relatives come from and the environment they grew up in.... This is a time to ask how is it that young people feel alienated from the country they were born in.”

Korea Joongang Daily / Seoul, South Korea
Korea’s struggling start-up culture

“The launch of new ‘innovation centers for creative economy’ ... in 17 metropolitan cities and provinces across the nation is a new experiment and meaningful challenge for our stagnant economy. Despite a startup boom over the last two decades, it failed to really go anywhere in this country...,” states an editorial. “In Silicon Valley, a myriad of far-sighted angel investors are channeling funds to promising startups from the earliest stages by playing the role of a de facto mentor for these fledgling firms.... If big companies with strong regional backgrounds play the role of mentor to local startups and help them advance to world markets, a Korean equivalent of the virtuous cycle will take root here.”

Hurriyet Daily News / Istanbul, Turkey
Turkey cannot waver against Islamic State

“Developments in Iraq and Syria ... are such that [Turkey] cannot just sit on the fence and expect others to take care of the threat posed by the [Islamic State] scourge.... Ankara is still trying to ward off negative publicity in the Western media which continues to claim that [IS] enjoys benefits in Turkey one way or another and that the government is allegedly turning a blind eye to the group. The bottom line is that this overall situation cannot go on...,” writes Semih Idiz. “Turkey is going to have to get actively involved in the fight against this group, even if this involvement is not in the form of a direct military confrontation with it.” 

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