Business Robert Reich

  • How 'flexible scheduling' is keeping workers in poverty

    Flexible scheduling is designed to make retail outlets, restaurants, hotels, and other customer-driven businesses more nimble and keep costs to a minimum, at the cost of regular hours and financial stability for workers. We need a federal law requiring employers to pay for scheduled work. 

  • How trade deals boost the rich and bust the rest

    I used to believe in trade agreements like the upcoming Trans Pacific Partnership. That was before the wages of most Americans stagnated and a relative few at the top captured just about all the economic gains.

  • We're setting the job market back 200 years

    With the rise of on-demand jobs like Uber, we're reverting back to a 19th-century job market where 'freedom  of contract' ruled the day. It was an era when many workers were 'happy' to toil 12-hour days in sweat shops for lack of any better alternative. 

  • Uber, Airbnb, and the 'share-the-scraps' economy

    Uber, Airbnb,Instacart, and other multibillion dollar startups make up what is referred to as the 'share economy.' A more accurate term would be the 'share-the-scraps' economy,' one that allows workers to patch together barely enough to live on. 

  • Wall Street is a threat to the American middle class

    The middle class is a hot political property for Republicans and Democrats alike, but the middle class can't be saved unless Wall Street is tamed. 

  • Why college isn't (and shouldn't be) for everyone (+video)

    A four-year college degree has become the only gateway into the American middle class, but not every young person is suited to four years of college. We need an alternative. 

  • What happens when robots replace all of our jobs?

    The combination of advanced sensors, voice recognition, artificial intelligence, big data, text-mining, and pattern-recognition algorithms, is generating smart robots capable of quickly learning human actions. That's bad news for the skilled labor market. 

  • America's well-being can't count on corporations

    The US economy is picking up steam but most Americans aren’t feeling it. Most European economies are still in bad shape, but most Europeans are doing well. Thank the outsize influence of American corporations. 

  • Will the Democratic nominee for 2016 take on Wall Street?

    The Democratic nominee for President will campaign on reviving the American middle class. But will she take on the moneyed interests – the large Wall Street banks, big corporations, and richest Americans – who have engineered the largest upward redistribution of wealth in modern American history?

April 24, 2015

Photos of the Day 04/24

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) special envoy, actress Angelina Jolie, winks as she arrives to speak during a United Nations Security Council meeting regarding the refugee crisis in Syria at the United Nations Headquarters in New York on Friday.

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