Subscribe

Business Robert Reich

  • Opinion: 'Corporate welfare' must go

    Corporation are not people and do not need subsidies or tax breaks, writes Robert Reich. Powerful companies do not need 'corporate welfare' – rather, real individuals and families need more support from the government.

  • The rise of the working poor and the non-working rich

    Despite myths to the contrary, a large and growing share of the nation’s poor work full time — sometimes 60 or more hours a week – yet still don’t earn enough to lift themselves and their families out of poverty. Meanwhile, a large and growing portion of the super-rich have never broken a sweat. 

  • Why college isn't (and shouldn't be) for everyone (+video)

    A four-year college degree has become the only gateway into the American middle class, but not every young person is suited to four years of college. We need an alternative. 

  • What happens when robots replace all of our jobs?

    The combination of advanced sensors, voice recognition, artificial intelligence, big data, text-mining, and pattern-recognition algorithms, is generating smart robots capable of quickly learning human actions. That's bad news for the skilled labor market. 

  • America's well-being can't count on corporations

    The US economy is picking up steam but most Americans aren’t feeling it. Most European economies are still in bad shape, but most Europeans are doing well. Thank the outsize influence of American corporations. 

  • Opinion: Why Americans need to reinvent the entire education system

    Senator Bernie Sanders argues that American public colleges should be tuition-free. Higher education should be, writes Robert Reich, but the US needs to reexamine and reinvent the country's entire education system to prepare for tomorrow's economy.

  • Small businesses to Republicans: Don't cut corporate taxes

    Small businesses owners have long joined with big corporations to back certain Republican candidates. But now they're breaking rank and telling congressional Republicans not to make the deal at the very top of big businesses’ wish list – a cut in corporate tax rates.  

  • Why Nike won't solve stagnant wages in America (+video)

    President Obama chose Nike headquarters in Oregon to deliver a defense of his proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership last week, as the company announced measures to boost its US manufacturing operations.  But Nike isn’t the solution to the problem of stagnant wages in America. Nike is the problem. 

May 27, 2015

Photos of the day 05/27

Democratic presidential candidate, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton greets guests after speaking to South Carolina House Democratic Women's Caucus and Women's Council, Wednesday, in Columbia, S.C.

More Robert Reich
  • America's well-being can't count on corporations

    The US economy is picking up steam but most Americans aren’t feeling it. Most European economies are still in bad shape, but most Europeans are doing well. Thank the outsize influence of American corporations. 

  • Will the Democratic nominee for 2016 take on Wall Street?

    The Democratic nominee for President will campaign on reviving the American middle class. But will she take on the moneyed interests – the large Wall Street banks, big corporations, and richest Americans – who have engineered the largest upward redistribution of wealth in modern American history?

  • How to make companies pay 'independent contractors' properly

    Independent contractors, including Uber drivers, franchisees, consultants, and free lancers, are subject to low pay, irregular hours, and job insecurity. In order to protect these workers, we need a better way to determine who qualifies as an employee of a company. 

  • How trade deals boost the rich and bust the rest

    I used to believe in trade agreements like the upcoming Trans Pacific Partnership. That was before the wages of most Americans stagnated and a relative few at the top captured just about all the economic gains.

  • We're setting the job market back 200 years

    With the rise of on-demand jobs like Uber, we're reverting back to a 19th-century job market where 'freedom  of contract' ruled the day. It was an era when many workers were 'happy' to toil 12-hour days in sweat shops for lack of any better alternative. 

  • Uber, Airbnb, and the 'share-the-scraps' economy

    Uber, Airbnb,Instacart, and other multibillion dollar startups make up what is referred to as the 'share economy.' A more accurate term would be the 'share-the-scraps' economy,' one that allows workers to patch together barely enough to live on. 

  • Wall Street is a threat to the American middle class

    The middle class is a hot political property for Republicans and Democrats alike, but the middle class can't be saved unless Wall Street is tamed. 

  • Jeb, Mitt zero in on inequality. Can Republicans get it right this time?

    Jeb Bush and Mitt Romney have outlined plans to reverse widening income inequality, alleviate poverty, and provide 'opportunity for all.'  However, evidence suggests that almost every time a Republican has moved into the White House, his policies have widened inequality. 

  • Why wages won't rise

    For worker wages to rise, the unemployment rate would have to sink far lower than it is today, probably below 4 percent. And there’s reason to believe the link between falling unemployment and rising wages has been severed.

  • How insider traders are rigging America

    Insider trading is illegal but major players on Wall Street still make tons of money because they're good at using confidential information.

Loading...