Business Robert Reich

  • Why college is necessary but gets you nowhere

    Since 2000, the incomes of young people who have graduated college have barely risen. The problem is this; while a college education is now a prerequisite for joining the middle class, the middle class is in lousy shape. A college degree no longer guarantees a good job. 

  • Back to school, and to widening inequality

    American kids are heading back to school, but they're entering back into a school system that is widening the achievement gap between lower and higher-income children. Here's what we can do about it. 

  • Money has made Americans sick of politics. What we can do about it.

    Americans are sick of politics. A large portion of the public doesn’t even bother voting, assuming the political game is fixed. The only way back toward a democracy and economy that work for the majority is for most of us to get politically active once again, becoming organized and mobilized.

  • Market Basket protests a victory for capitalism for all, not some

    Market Basket CEO Arthur T. Demoulas worked to keep prices low and pay his employees more. No wonder that when the board moved to oust him in favor of someone who would increase profitability for shareholders, managers, employees, and customers of Market Basket were outraged. 

  • Robert Reich: Valuable workers to society are underpaid

    People who contribute to society, such as teachers and social workers, make far less money than they should, writes Robert Reich. For example, Robert Reich points out that personal-care aids who help the elderly and people with disabilities make about $20,000 a year. 

  • Why Donald Trump doesn't bear the economic risks of ordinary Americans

    In America, people with lots of money can avoid the consequences of bad bets and big losses by cashing out at the first sign of trouble – like Donald Trump and his ill-fated Atlantic City casinos. But workers who move to a place like Atlantic City for a job, invest in a home there, and build their skills, have no protections

  • What is Harvard Business School's responsibility in addressing income inequality?

    For years, some of the nation’s most talented young people have flocked to Harvard Business School and other elite business schools  in order to take up positions at the top rungs of American corporations. But are they learning the right lessons about helping society thrive? 

  • The 'Soda Wars' are coming to your town

    Berkely, Calif. is facing major opposition from the beverage industry for its proposed soda tax, which will be on the ballot in November. The beverage industry has spent millions defeating such measures across the country, but can it do so in America's most progressive city? 

  • Why the poor are paying for Detroit's bankruptcy

    Detroit's bankruptcy is a model for how wealthier and whiter Americans escape the costs of public goods they’d otherwise share with poorer and darker Americans. Are Detroit, its public employees, poor residents, and bondholders the only ones who should sacrifice when 'Detroit' can’t pay its bills? Or does the relevant sphere of responsibility include Detroit’s affluent suburbs?

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