ADP: Jobs increased in October

Staffing firm ADP reports that employment improved slightly in October, as private employers added 43,000 jobs.

  • close
    The number of people on private payrolls, not counting farm laborers, increased slightly in October (blue line). The number of new jobs is almost identical to this point last year (light green area) and last month (dark green area).
    SoldAtTheTop / The Paper Economy
    View Caption
  • About video ads
    View Caption
of

Today, private staffing and business services firm ADP released the latest installment of their National Employment Report indicating that the situation for private employment in the U.S. improved slightly in October as private employers added 43,000 jobs in the month leaving the total employment level just 0.04% below the level seen in October 2009.

Goods-producing firms fared a bit worse losing on net 34,000 jobs while service-providing firms added 77,000 jobs nationwide.

Looking at the chart (click for full-screen dynamic version) showing ADP’s total private nonfarm payrolls since 2001 as well as the year-over-year and month-to-month percent change, you can see that the so-called “recovery” has been anemic.

Perusing the rest of the data in the ADP dataset it’s obvious that our economy faces some significant headwinds coming from the job market with continually collapsing goods-producing payrolls and feeble trends service-producing payrolls.

Look for Friday’s BLS Employment Situation Report to likely show somewhat similar trends.

Add/view comments on this post.

------------------------------

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best economy-related bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link above.

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK