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AT&T calls off bid for T-Mobile. Now what?

AT&T will give T-Mobile parent $3 billion in cash and another $1 billion in spectrum. But the collapse of the deal leaves T-Mobile in a tougher spot than AT&T.

By Rachel Metz and Ryan NakashimaAP Business Writers / December 20, 2011

This file photo combo shows the logos of the communications companies AT&T and Deutsche Telekom. But AT&T on Monday said that it is ending its $39 billion bid to buy T-Mobile USA after facing fierce government objections. AT&T's purchase of T-Mobile from Deutsche Telekom of Germany would have made it the largest cellphone company in the US.

AP/File

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LOS ANGELES

AT&T Inc. is hanging up on its $39 billion bid to buy smaller wireless provider T-Mobile USA, nearly four months after the U.S. government raised concerns that it would raise prices, reduce innovation and give customers fewer choices.

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The long-expected announcement left AT&T grumbling about a shortage of airwaves to expand its services, while scrappy competitor T-Mobile remains up for sale by German parent Deutsche Telekom.

The formal end of the deal was heralded by critics. No. 3 carrier Sprint Nextel Corp. had feared "an undeniable duopoly" between the proposed new entity and current leader Verizon Wireless. The two companies would have controlled almost 80 percent of the cellphone market had the deal gone through.

"This result is a victory for the millions of Americans who use mobile wireless telecommunications services," Deputy U.S. Attorney General James Cole said. "A significant competitor remains in the marketplace and consumers will benefit from a quick resolution."

The Justice Department had sued on Aug. 31 to block the merger, and the Federal Communications Commission's chairman came out against it last month. That prompted the companies to withdraw their FCC application while they strategized their next move.

Sanford Bernstein analyst Craig Moffett said the announcement was "a bit of an anticlimax."

"This is like receiving the divorce papers for a couple that's been separated for years," he said.

AT&T's purchase of fourth-ranked T-Mobile, announced in March, would have made it the largest cellphone company in the U.S. AT&T is now the second-largest wireless carrier, with more than 100 million subscribers, behind Verizon Wireless, with 108 million. Sprint has 53 million, followed by T-Mobile at 34 million.

T-Mobile endured without much investment from its parent company and without the highest-end devices such as Apple Inc.'s iPhone. It offered value packages to customers who brought phones from other carriers. Regulators feared the loss of T-Mobile as a competitor would hurt consumers.

AT&T will now have to pay Deutsche Telekom $3 billion in cash as a breakup fee and give it about $1 billion worth of airwaves, known as spectrum, that AT&T doesn't need for the continued rollout of its high-speed "4G" network.

It will also enter into a roaming agreement with Deutsche Telekom so that AT&T's and T-Mobile's customers can use each other's networks.

AT&T will take an accounting charge of $4 billion in the current quarter.

In pulling out, AT&T said the government's attempts to block the deal do not change the challenges of the wireless phone industry. Cellphone companies have been clamoring for more airwaves to meet growing demand for faster downloads on smartphones and tablet computers.

The company said the deal would have solved that problem for a time, and without it, "customers will be harmed and needed investment will be stifled."

AT&T said it will continue to invest, and it called on the government to quickly approve its purchase of unused spectrum from Qualcomm Inc. and come up with legislation to meet the nation's long-term needs.

FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski said the commission agreed with AT&T that Congress should authorize an auction for additional spectrum. The FCC has proposed persuading television stations to give up their airwaves in exchange for sharing in auction proceeds.