Subscribe

How China is bringing its fuel quality standards up to global levels

China already aims to cut its horrific urban air pollution by aggressively promoting electric cars and implementing stricter fuel-economy standards over the next few years. On Monday, the government also announced plans to attack the problem of emissions from a different angle.

  • close
    Visitors walk around the new Hyundai Tucson during Auto China 2016 auto show in Beijing, China (May 4, 2016). China aims to cut its horrific urban air pollution by aggressively promoting electric cars and implementing stricter fuel-economy standards over the next few years.
    Jason Lee/Reuters/File
    View Caption
  • About video ads
    View Caption
of

China already aims to cut its horrific urban air pollution by aggressively promoting electric cars and implementing stricter fuel-economy standards over the next few years.

On Monday, the government also announced plans to attack the problem of emissions from a different angle.

New fuel-quality standards for gasoline and diesel will be enacted in January 2017, reported the Xinhua state news agency.

Xinhua cited an announcement from the Beijing Municipal Environmental Protection Bureau on the fuel standards, according to Reuters.

The new "Beijing Six" standards are expected to cut pollutants from vehicles in China's capital city by 15 to 20 percent, according to a researcher with the Environmental Protection Bureau.

In addition, China plans to implement "National Five" standards—considered to be the equivalent of Euro V standards—nationally in January 2017 as well.

Those standards are currently in place only in China's more economically developed eastern provinces, according to Reuters.

It's unclear whether the Beijing Six standards will be implemented outside Beijing itself, but they are understood to be somewhat stricter than the National V standards.

They include a maximum sulfur content of 10 parts per million, a requirement likely aimed at older diesel commercial trucks.

On May 20, Beijing's municipal government announced that it would retire 400,000 trucks and mini buses that run on low-quality, high-sulfur fuel in 2016 and 2017.

They also reportedly mandate lower levels of the pollutants benzene and polycyclic aromtaic hydrocarbon (PAH) than the Euro V standards.

The tight timeline for implementing new fuel-quality standards comes as China works to accelerate tougher emissions standards.

In April, the government announced that stricter emissions standards originally set to take effect in 2020 will begin rolling out next year.

Roughly equivalent to current U.S. and European standards, they'll first be applied to metropolitan areas, with nationwide adoption in 2018.

China will also still require carmakers to achieve a fuel-economy fleet average of 47 mpg by 2020, as measured on the country's own testing standard.

This article first appeared at GreenCarReports.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best auto bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.

About these ads
Sponsored Content by LockerDome
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK