Subscribe

Following gas-mileage error, new labels on the way for GM's large SUVs

It would appear that every automaker is rechecking its gas-mileage calculations these days. The latest episode comes from General Motors, which told its dealers on Wednesday to stop selling certain large crossover SUVs due to errors in the fuel-economy ratings on their window stickers.

  • close
    The General Motors logo at the company's world headquarters in Detroit (May 16, 2014).
    Paul Sancya/AP/File
    View Caption
  • About video ads
    View Caption
of

It would appear that every automaker is rechecking its gas-mileage calculations these days.

The ongoing VW diesel-emission cheating scandal and Mitsubishi's recent admission that it misstated fuel-economy results in Japan for more than 20 years have led to renewed public attention to how makers are complying—or not—with emission and consumption rules.

The latest episode comes from General Motors, which told its dealers on Wednesday to stop selling certain large crossover SUVs due to errors in the fuel-economy ratings on their window stickers.

As reported by industry trade journal Automotive News on Friday, GM told its dealers to halt sales of almost 60,000 vehicles in the 2016 Chevrolet Traverse, Buick Enclave, and GMC Acadia SUV lines.

The company said it was printing replacement labels, which were to start arriving at dealers this past weekend.

All dealerships should have received those new labels by Tuesday, May 17, GM said in a memo to the dealers.

A spokesperson for the company attributed the errors on the label to an unspecified "data transmission" problem. He said it had notified the EPA as soon as it discovered the error.

There's no indication at this point that GM's test procedures are in question, and the EPA's FuelEconomy.org website has the correct ratings. Instead, the wrong ratings seem to have been printed on the window stickers.

All three vehicles are built on the same underpinnings, with variations in the body panels and interior trim.

For 2016, their all-wheel-drive models are EPA-rated at 15 mpg city, 22 mpg highway, and 17 mpg combined—but the labels showed highway and combined ratings that were 2 mpg higher.

Versions with front-wheel drive also carried incorrect ratings; the correct numbers for those models are 15 city, 22 highway, and 18 combined.

The company sold approximately 20,000 of the three vehicles combined each month this year (including some leftover 2015 models).

It will send new labels to their owners. It is also discussing with the EPA how it will address any complaints.

As Automotive News notes, "It’s unclear whether GM could face government fines or penalties because of the error."

In recent years, Korean makers Hyundai and Kia reimbursed owners and paid fines to the EPA for overstating fuel-economy results on roughly a dozen models.

Ford was forced to reduce the EPA ratings on six different models, mostly hybrid and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

One of those was the Ford C-Max Hybrid, which had already been subject to a previous reduction.

And Mitsubishi admitted last month that it had used incorrect fuel-economy test procedures for a variety of models sold in Japan since 1991.

It has since confirmed that the correct test procedures were followed for all vehicles sold in the U.S.

This article first appeared at GreenCarReports.

The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of the best auto bloggers out there. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by the Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers' own, as is responsibility for the content of their blogs. To contact us about a blogger, click here. To add or view a comment on a guest blog, please go to the blogger's own site by clicking on the link in the blog description box above.

About these ads
Sponsored Content by LockerDome
 
 
Make a Difference
Inspired? Here are some ways to make a difference on this issue.
FREE Newsletters
Get the Monitor stories you care about delivered to your inbox.
 

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...

Save for later

Save
Cancel

Saved ( of items)

This item has been saved to read later from any device.
Access saved items through your user name at the top of the page.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You reached the limit of 20 saved items.
Please visit following link to manage you saved items.

View Saved Items

OK

Failed to save

You have already saved this item.

View Saved Items

OK