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Donald Marron

The government shutdown cost the US 120,000 jobs

A new paper examining the lasting effects of the government shutdown estimates that it cost the US economy 120,000 jobs by October 12. 

By Guest blogger / October 24, 2013

The Capitol in Washington. A new report examines the macroeconomic effects of the government shutdown, from retail sales to jobs to housing.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP/File

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The Council of Economic Advisers just released an interesting paper examining the macroeconomic harm from the government shutdown and debt limit brinksmanship. To do so, they created a Weekly Economic Index from data that are released either daily or weekly (and weren’t delayed by the shutdown). These data include measures of consumer sentiment, unemployment claims, retail sales, steel production, and mortgage purchase applications.

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Donald B. Marron is director of economic policy initiatives at the Urban Institute. He previously served as a member of the President's Council of Economic Advisers and as acting director of the Congressional Budget Office.

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The headline result: They estimate that the budget showdown cost about 120,000 jobs by October 12.

Looking ahead, I wonder whether this index might prove useful in identifying future shocks to the economy, whether positive or negative. As the authors note:

"In normal times estimating weekly changes in the economy is likely to detract from the focus on the more meaningful longer term trends in the economy which are best measured over a monthly, quarterly, or even yearly basis. But when there is a sharp shift in the economic environment, analyzing high-frequency changes with only a very short lag since they occurred can be very valuable."

P.S. I am pleased to see CEA come down on the right side of the ”brinksmanship” vs. “brinkmanship” debate.

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