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'$16 house' scheme gets man kicked out of $340,000 home

$16 house? Not really. Dallas man gains notoriety for his curious housing scheme. However, he was kicked out of the $16 house on Monday.

By Nomaan MerchantAssociated Press / February 6, 2012

$16 house: Kenneth Robinson vacuums the spacious living room of the home he's occupying in Flower Mound, Texas. Robinson, who gained notoriety for claiming he could live in a $340,000 suburban Dallas house for $16, has vacated the home following a judge's order.

Tom Fox/The Dallas Morning News/AP

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FLOWER MOUND, Texas

After paying $16 to file a one-page claim to an empty, $340,000 home in an upscale Dallas suburb, Kenneth Robinson moved in furniture, hung a "No Trespassing" sign in the front window and invited television cameras inside for a tour.

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He quickly turned into something of a local celebrity, creating a website — http://16dollarhouse.com — where he sold an e-book and offered training sessions for would-be squatters. And while real estate experts and authorities say he's misusing the law, Robinson appears to have inspired dozens of imitators who moved into Dallas-Fort Worth area homes — some of which were still occupied by their owners.

But Robinson's time in the house ran out Monday.

 

Bank of America wants possession after foreclosing on the home last month, and a judge on Monday gave Robinson until Feb. 13 to appeal or move out. Rather than wait to be evicted, Robinson slipped out before sunrise Monday, skipped a morning court hearing and refused to say where he was moving next.

"It's been a huge learning experience," he said in a phone call with reporters.

On his website, Robinson describes himself as a savvy investor who's part of a "paradigm shift" in which people have taken over abandoned homes. In his "adverse possession" claim filed in court last June, he promised to pay taxes and homeowners' association fees while living in the house. He kept the lawn outside mowed, and the front clean.

Robinson spoke to The Associated Press last week while standing at the front door of the two-story, 3,200-square-foot home with a backyard pool. He declined to discuss his background or say how much money he made from book sales or seminars related to his takeover.

He said he started his website — which describes him as "poised, measured, insightful and wise" — to keep the media and others from misleading the public about his story.

"They think some bum off the street came and paid $15 to get a $300,000 house by filing a piece of paperwork," Robinson said. "That is not the case. That is the sum of what happened."

Robinson's website says he's not a lawyer and isn't offering legal advice but has done real estate research.

Real estate experts say he's got the law just plain wrong.

Adverse possession statutes can be found in most states, said Brian C. Rider, a real estate lawyer and professor at the University of Texas. Someone who has openly taken charge of abandoned land for an extended period of time — using a driveway on a neighbor's property, for example — could try to claim that land later, he said.

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