A flying carpet ride of memories

When we told friends and family of our plans to travel with our baby to Turkey, they were amazed.

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We had been in Istanbul, Turkey, for only a few days and already knew that we stood out. When the carpet sellers who lined the streets of the Sultanahmet, the city's ancient historic district, saw us from the back, they took note of my husband's close-cropped hair and yelled out, "Soldier! Soldierman! Mr. Army, Mr. Navy! Come inside and see a carpet. Maybe your pretty wife will like one, you buy it for her! Maybe not. You don't like, you need not buy, but come look!"

But when they got a good look at our fronts, with the small, wriggling bundle strapped to my husband's chest, they changed tactics. As soon as they saw our infant son held fast in his baby carrier - his eyes open wide and bright, taking in the extraordinary and beautiful city surrounding him - they took a slightly less aggressive approach.

One man walked toward us with his arms open wide and asked, "Please, excuse me, may I kiss your baby?" Others pulled photos of children and grandchildren from their wallets and invited us into the shop to see still more. Yet another seller asked us to come into his shop to see some carpets that he was sure our son would adore.

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"Your son," the man said, giving us his best sales pitch, "he may not remember Turkey. I don't think so. But you will help him remember. Maybe the carpet will help him remember. I think, maybe yes."

Memory. This was a small point of contention with us. When we told friends and family of our plans to travel with our son to Turkey, our announcement was sometimes met with disapproval - and always with many questions: What will he eat? Where will he sleep? Won't the plane bother his ears? And the most-asked question: Why go through the hassle of taking the baby at all, when he won't remember the trip?

It was only this last question that we had some difficulty answering, wondering a bit about the answer ourselves.

On our last full day in the city, we went to explore the Ayasofya basilica. The baby had thus far been fascinated by Istanbul and, on this day, was just as intrigued with the immense interior of this building. It was considered the most beautiful Christian church in the world when it was completed in 537. Then, after the fall of Constantinople in 1453, it was converted into a mosque. In 1934 it was proclaimed a museum.

Enchanted by the history and majesty of the building, none of us saw the schoolchildren approach. But all of a sudden, there they were - 20 or more - swarming around my husband and son, reaching for my son's hands and kissing his face.

At first, I was a little worried that the baby would be unable to handle the onslaught. As a typical 8-month-old, he is fairly accustomed to being adored. But not like this. Still, when I looked over at him, to see if I needed to intervene, he was laughing so hard his whole body shook. He reached out his hands to touch as many of the children as he could reach. His delight in seeing so many smiling faces looking up at him was palpable.

All of a sudden, a young boy in the crowd noticed me and asked in heavily accented English, "You are mother? Excuse me, thank you, what is the baby name?"

"His name is Chet." I replied.

"Chet." He repeated the name a few times, working it around his mouth as if trying a new, intense flavor. "My name is Kerem. Hello, Chet Mother."

The other children took note of the introduction and followed suit. I soon heard shouts of other names.

"I am Nazim!"

"My name is Berol."

"Hello, my name is Alev, thank you, goodbye."

"Kadifah, hello, how are you?"

And then a little girl with gorgeous dark eyes looked up at me and mischievously said, "My name is ... my name is Jennifer Lopez!" The children laughed wholeheartedly at the joke, and my son laughed with them, the echoes joyfully reverberating in the great dome of the building. I couldn't help but smile, knowing that my son's first trip to Istanbul had offered him more than many - and even we - had thought possible.

True, he may not remember the specifics of the mosaics in theAyasofya orthe grounds of the Topkapi Palace. But I believe that the most important aspects of any journey like this stay with you whether you are 8 months or 80 years old.

This trip included children's laughter, the same as at home and yet still able to make a powerful impression no matter where you happen to hear it. Add the sublime mystery of ancient buildings, full of colors and echoes that stir the heart and mind. And, most importantly, the spirit of adventure that wells up inside as you stare out on a new and fascinating landscape - perhaps even better when held aloft in a baby carrier - and anticipating the magic of whatever comes next.

No carpet is needed to remind my son of that.

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