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By Compiled from wire service reports by Robert Kilborn and Ross Atkin / June 30, 2005



Uh-oh, what have we done?

With a long and successful record in food-marketing, you'd assume that Kellogg's has made few missteps along the way. Now, however, critics believe they've caught it in a lulu , and as a result the cereal giant reportedly is reconsidering the name of one of its newest products, Coco Rocks. Sounds innocent enough, right? After all, it's what a spokeswoman calls "rock-shaped pillows filled with chocolate." But British news outlets report that "coco rocks" is street slang for a type of crack cocaine to which pudding is added during production. The Sun (London) quotes a spokesman for a charity that works on drug issues as saying, "You'd think ... Kellogg's would have teams of people checking new brand names to see what they might mean."

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It's all a blur: who's the fastest over 100 meters

Editors of ESPN: The Magazine recently compared how long it takes the top competitors in various championship-level sports to travel 100 meters, the standard Olympic distance for laying claim to being the world's fastest human. The "winner": drag-racing driver Scott Kalitta, whose car has been clocked at that distance in less than one second. Selected categories, with the athlete, animal, or object involved, and the time (in seconds) that each zipped 100 meters, from the magazine:

Hot Rod Winternationals: 0.68, by 2005 champion Scott Kalitta
Indianapolis 500: 1.42, by 2005 winner Dan Wheldon
World Archery Indoor Championship: 1.49, arrow from the bow of Michael Peart
Kentucky Derby: 6.21, by 2005 winning horse Giacomo
Tour de France: 9.85, by defending champion Lance Armstrong
Olympic 100-meter dash: 9.85, by 2004 men's champion Justin Gatlin
Idatarod sled-dog race: 48.10, by 2004 winner Robert Sorlie

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