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Letters

March 9, 2005



Whatever Novak's role, source of Plame leak must be revealed

I disagree with Pat M. Holt's analysis of the Plame controversy ("Plame leak is not journalism's sin," March 3).

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Most leaks of government information are not violations of the law. The leak of Plame's identity perhaps was a violation.

Robert Novak was more than simply "the messenger," to use Mr. Holt's term. He facilitated the disclosure of the protected information and in the process hid the identity of the possible lawbreaker.

Mr. Novak wittingly or unwittingly drove the getaway car. Why should the identity of the passenger be protected?
Michael Curry
Austin, Texas

Overhaul Pakistan's judicial system

The March 2 article "Pakistani religious law challenged" is thought provoking. It is not just a law that needs to be changed in Pakistan. Islam, according to most scholars, is a religion and a way of life. In Pakistan, it is a state-sponsored ideology. The website of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan provides information on the country's Council for Islamic Ideology. Pakistan also has a Federal Sharia Court, which has jurisdiction over the entire country. The council and sharia court need to be abolished if future travesties of justice are to be avoided.
Prof. Arun Khanna
Butler University
Indianapolis

Ending death penalty helps quell violence

Regarding the March 3 editorial "A Step to End Death Penalty": Bravo for a fine editorial applauding the Supreme Court decision against the death penalty for minors. Advocates of the death penalty have often argued its importance as a deterrent, without thinking about how such an act actually encourages an atmosphere where killing can be considered an acceptable option in a problem situation.

Certainly our best hope for overcoming the problem of violence in our world is in first agreeing that the intentional taking of human life is never legitimate. Let's hope the Court's decision will help us make some desperately needed progress in that direction.
Scott Laningham
Leander, Texas

Give pit bulls a shot at reformation

Regarding the March 2 piece "Pit bulls can't shake bad rap": I was pleased to read the comments of those defending this complex canine, but the story left out the "bad" pit's potential for change.

I learned this the hard way when I was attacked on my roller skates by two menacing pit bulls. It was the scariest event of my life as I desperately fought off a sustained attack, finally to be rescued by a female passerby who, unlike all the men hiding in their cars, bravely risked her life for mine.

Counter to common sense, I decided to give these two another chance. One was killed before I could intervene, but the other I sprang from the pound with a plan for rehab.

It was all kisses and wags and we became fast friends. Soon this demon dog was pulling me all over town on the same skates I'd been attacked on! It was this experience that has convinced me that it's never too late to rehabilitate. These amazing, loyal, loving dogs can and will come back from the brink and they deserve a break.
Matt Rossell
Northwest outreach coordinator, In Defense of Animals
Portland, Ore.

Huge market for normal-sized clothes

Regarding the Feb. 24 article "Which came first, thin women or tiny sizes?": Am I the only one who wonders why designers and clothing manufacturers don't seize the opportunity to make lots of money by catering to normal-sized people? It shouldn't be about the clothes - it should be about the people wearing them.
Annelies Kamran
Brookhaven, N.Y.

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