Today's Story Line:

The Russian military's Chechnya information campaign is starting to fray. On Sunday, a Russian mothers' group reported 3,000 soldiers have been killed - five times the official figure. A look at the tribulations of reporting in the region.

Few may mourn the execution of Serbia's most notorious war criminal, Zeljko "Arkan" Raznatovic. But Arkan's death may be seen as a blow to the restoration of the rule of law in the region.

South Africa's rapt attention during a week of efforts to save trapped gold miners may indicate that the nation is now ready to address the poor safety measures in one of its most important industries (page 7). Quote of note: "Fifteen years ago, black miners were not treated like human beings. At least now, the country cares." - South African mining union leader.

The British were forced to admit homosexuals into the military last week. This decision is part of a Europe-wide chafing over growing supranational rule.

David Clark Scott World editor

REPORTERS ON THE JOB..

**POST-APARTHEID COVERAGE: For most of last week, South Africans were captivated by the efforts to rescue South African miners trapped underground. It was front-page news, and radio stations carried live updates on events. But it wasn't always so. During the apartheid era, coverage of mine disasters was restricted. "Road blocks were set up to prevent the media from getting to the mines," says Johannesburg-based Corinna Schuler. A mine union leader told her that "in the old days," Corinna and other journalists would not have been allowed into the mining hospital to interview survivors. But it's not carte blanche. After a short and chaotic press conference, Corinna stopped to chat with another convalescing miner - and was reprimanded by a doctor for talking to him "without permission."

Let us hear from you.

Mail to: One Norway Street, Boston, MA 02115 via e-mail: world@csmonitor.com

(c) Copyright 2000. The Christian Science Publishing Society

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