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By Compiled from news wiresLiz Marlantes / January 4, 2000



Decision to end busing blocked

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. - A federal appeals court blocked a ruling that terminated busing in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school system, the first major urban district in the United States to bus children to achieve racial balance. The Fourth US Circuit Court of Appeals issued a stay on Dec. 30 against US District Judge Robert Potter's September order ending race-based school assignments in North Carolina's largest school system. Seven white parents had asked Judge Potter to declare the Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools integrated, and he ruled in their favor, despite opposition from the schools and black parents. The stay suspends enforcement of Potter's order until the appeals court can rule on the merits of the case.

Strike continues at Mexican university

MEXICO CITY - Eight months into a student-led strike that has paralyzed Latin America's largest university, talks have reached an impasse. Striking students shut down the National Autonomous University (UNAM) and barricaded its main campus last April to protest a plan to charge tuition fees. UNAM officials quickly backed down and said the tuition fees would be voluntary. But strike leaders then made other demands, calling for reforms to benefit poor students and give students a greater voice on campus. Last week, UNAM representatives called off a series of talks, saying the conditions set by students to begin negotiating were unreasonable. Students have already lost two semesters, and the UNAM's losses are estimated at $160 million.

Students keep promise, 38 years later

DENVER - For decades, beginning in 1962, high school history teacher Dick Jordan told his students to meet him on the steps of the Denver Public Library on the first day of the year 2000. He also told them to bring a dollar, because he planned to be retired and figured he'd need the money to go to Tahiti. On Saturday, more than 100 former students showed up - and they brought their dollars. They came from Alaska, Texas, Los Angeles, and New York, and brought children and grandchildren. Mr. Jordan, who retired five years ago, said he changed his mind about going to Tahiti and will donate the money to a soup kitchen.

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(c) Copyright 1999. The Christian Science Publishing Society