WORTH NOTING ON TV

* SUNDAY

A Year in Provence (A&E channel, 8-10 p.m.): Writer Peter Mayle and his wife Annie thought their move from London to a 200-year-old farmhouse in France's Luberon valley would be blissful. But their efforts to renovate their new home turned out to be so full of humorous mishaps that it formed the basis of two best-selling books. The four-part series beginning here is a dramatic adaptation of those books, following the couple through their adventures - including culinary ones - with the people and cultu re of the area. John Thaw plays Peter and Lindsay Duncan is Annie. * MONDAY

Firing Line debate (PBS, 9-11 p.m.): If anything promises to generate rhetorical electricity it's this resolution: `Women in the Military Should Be Excluded from Combat.' It will be argued by opposing panels of articulate partisans on the neutral grounds of George Washington University's Marvin Center Theatre. If you think West Point or Annapolis would have been the more interesting site, so did `Firing Line' founder William F. Buckley, who heads the side supporting the resolution. In a recent column he took the Pentagon to task for not allowing the debate to be held at one of the service academies. Leading the opposition is Rep. Pat Schroeder (D) of Colorado, who loves to mix it up with conservatives on panels like these.

The Wild West (Prime Time Entertainment Network, 8-10 p.m.): This is a West seen not through scholarship but the eyes of those who lived in it. Tapping a huge repertoire of resources, the marathon documentary probes the story of real people, in an effort to get a realistic understanding of a period more heavily laden with folklore than virtually any other. The program takes viewers from the end of the Civil War through the turn of the century, using first-person narratives, revealing excerpts from journ als, newspaper accounts, and lots of sketches and photos. The narrator is Jack Lemmon, whose 1958 film `Cowboy' remains one of the most credible productions about that period. Some 50 traditional songs of the period are sung by Crystal Gayle and other artists.

Please check local listings for all programs.

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