How an Electron Accelerator Achieves High Energies In Short Distances

A driver pulse of electrons is introduced into the pipe and accelrated along it. Very shortly, about 7 billionths of a second later, the trailing pulse--a small pulse of electrons--is injected behind the driver. As the driver pulse moves down the tube, it induces an opposite charge in the ceramic tube wall. This moving charge sets up waves behind the driver--somewhat like the wave following in the wake of a boat--that accelerate the trailing electron pulse.

The driver pulse is re-injected regularly (not shown). In this way, the trailing electrons can be accelerated to very high energies in short distances. -30-{et

Share this story:

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...