Feeling Lost and Without Hope?

A FEELING of being lost and vulnerable sometimes seems unavoidable. Some of us may be lost in the midst of family inharmony; others, living alone, may be feeling isolated and ignored. And there are those who may feel lost in the throes of some illness. During my life I've felt ``lost'' in all of these ways. At the time, each circumstance seemed unbearable. Only turning to God in prayer got me through. Some might feel this is a rather trite statement. But it isn't to me, and it doesn't need to be for you.

One thing that has helped me is to realize that God sent His Son to save ``that which was lost.''1 Christ Jesus didn't turn his back on anyone seeking aid or comfort or health. No sin was too ingrained to be redeemed; no disease was too far gone to be healed; and no storm was too strong to yield to Christ. But the people had to reach out to the Master, to be receptive to him.

In his experience with Jesus, the man at the pool of Bethesda learned an essential element of healing and redemption. The fifth chapter of John relates that this man had been infirm for thirty-eight years and was waiting by the pool because it was purported to heal at certain times. The Gospel also tells us that Jesus ``knew that he had been now a long time in that case.'' The account follows this thought with the Master's profound question ``Wilt thou be made whole?''

At first reading this would seem to be calling for a rather obvious answer. Of course the man wanted to be whole! To me it seems more plausible that Jesus was inquiring if the man thought wholeness was still possible after all those years. And the man's reply addressed this point. He did expect healing -- if someone would just put him into the pool at the proper time. Jesus responded with the command ``Rise, take up thy bed, and walk.''

With this same power and authority, God's healing Christ will come to us today if we are willing to accept it. Mary Baker Eddy2 writes in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, ``Throughout all generations both before and after the Christian era, the Christ, as the spiritual idea, -- the reflection of God, -- has come with some measure of power and grace to all prepared to receive Christ, Truth.''3

To be receptive to Christ, we need to pray to understand more of man's true heritage as the child of God. Recognizing ourselves as God's wholly spiritual offspring, made in His image and likeness, we come to see that we can't for an instant be separated from His love, His goodness and wholeness. The Master's wonderful works proved this. As Science and Health tells us, ``Jesus of Nazareth taught and demonstrated man's oneness with the Father, and for this we owe him endless homage.''4

Acknowledging our oneness with God begins to free us from feelings of vulnerability and isolation. We learn that God's law is actually operating in our lives. And God's law, the law of divine Love, can only be a law of blessing -- not of penalty. It is also a law of restoration. As we purify our thoughts and lean more on God's guidance, we lose the feeling that we are lost and alone. We are indeed walking with God.

As I've sincerely tried to live a better life and humbly reached out to God, His saving Christ has healed me when I was sick, warmed my heart with love when I felt alone, and brought hope where there seemed to be only inharmony. Through prayer, you too can expect such deliverance.

1Matthew 18:11. 2The Discoverer and Founder of Christian Science. 3Science and Health, p. 333. 4Ibid., p. 18.

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