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Over an open fire. At Randall's, authentic 18th-century fare means extraordinary hearth-cooked meals

By Patricia MandellSpecial to The Christian Science Monitor / November 25, 1987



North Stonington, Conn.

IN this era of high-tech kitchens complete with microwaves and Cuisinarts, you don't expect a gourmet meal cooked in the fireplace. But at Randall's Ordinary in North Stonington, Conn., Bill and Cindy Clark serve hearth-cooked dinners every night. At their inn, the Clarks serve 18th-century fare in an evening that is part theater, part entertainment, and part dinner. Dressed in authentic 18th-century costume, the Clarks also use 18th-century recipes and 18th-century antique cooking utensils, painstakingly collected over many years. They don't even own a microwave. Their inn, a 17th-century farmhouse, was home for 200 years to the Randall family, and was rebuilt several times during the 18th century. Now it is extensively furnished with 18th-century antiques.

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On a recent evening, a fire blazed cheerily as a goose roasted in a reflector oven set on the hearth. Though outside the windows it was black and chill, the kitchen was toasty warm, romantically lighted with antique candelabra.

Cindy Clark, dressed in a simple white chemise, apron, and floor-length skirt, knelt to tend a steaming iron kettle of country onion soup. The corn bread was done, and she was preparing to cook new potatoes with parsley, and Iroquois squash - zucchini with scallions, dill, and honey. Later she would broil lamb chops and swordfish steaks to order, and cook the apple crisp dessert.

Her husband, Bill, wearing a white shirt and knee breeches with white stockings, ushered diners into the kitchen to catch a glimpse of the proceedings. Guests buzzed about, admiring Cindy's technique and the kitchen's heavy ceiling beams and wide planked floors. There were murmurs of ``Fantastic!'' and ``Great!'' Cindy passed around a wooden bowl of popcorn cooked over the fire in a 19th-century popper. The popcorn had scarcely a burned kernel.

As the guests returned to the candlelit dining room, they were clearly already in an 18th-century mood, with modern-day cares forgotten. With only one dinner seating, guests can relax all evening. A few chose a long wooden table right in front of the kitchen fireplace, for a ringside seat. ``People enjoy seeing the equipment used; it's so unusual to them to see it done,'' Cindy says. Until they really see it, they're often suspicious that the food is actually cooked in a ``real'' kitchen.

The Clarks have been cooking in the fireplace for almost 20 years, starting with private parties for friends at their former New York home, and perfecting their technique over time. In New York, they also taught hearth cooking.

What brought the Clarks to begin serving hearth-cooked meals to the public was a strong love of the 18th century. They started collecting antiques soon after they married, and later restored and lived in 18th-century houses in New York and Connecticut. ``The fireplaces really fascinated us, the idea of the fireplace being the focus of everyday family life,'' Cindy says. In Connecticut, they met members of a local historical society who did open-hearth cooking.

The couple decided to try it themselves, and their first experiment was beef stew, which they served to friends. ``But it took quite a while to do an entire meal over the fireplace,'' Cindy says - several years, in fact. Largely self-taught, the Clarks read antique cookbooks, attended cooking demonstrations at such places as Old Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts, and asked lots of questions. ``We mostly had to learn through trial and error,'' Bill says. After several years of experiments, they could prepare a meal of corn bread, soup, two vegetables, an entree, and dessert, all in the fireplace, all delectable.