European Parliament welcomes act

By , Special to The Christian Science Monitor

One European who will welcome the implementation of the Single European Act is Sheila Faith, the Conservative Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for Cumbria and Lancashire North in England's northwest corner. ``The Single European Act is going to give the European Parliament more influence,'' says Mrs. Faith, whose constituency includes the world's oldest nuclear power plant, Sellafield. ``The Parliament is going to be able to delay commission regulations and directives if the commission can't get a certain majority in the chamber.''

She said the act would bring greater effectiveness to all the institutions and encourage the European Council of Ministers - who still have the final say under the reform - to make up its mind, because ministers would be able to make decisions by majority vote.

She said the reform would give ``a keener edge and more relevance'' to the work of MEPs, who act as representatives of local people throughout the European Community. ``Our views will be more listened to....''

Recommended: Default

How does Faith plan to exercise this enlarged influence? ``I and other MEPs are hoping to use our influence not only to see changes in the Common Agricultural Policy, but also to see the breakdown of barriers to trade in the EEC....''

Faith has obtained European cash for various projects in her constituency, including the nuclear power plant at Sellafield.

What's next on her agenda? ``I am ... appealing to the commission for help for Cumbrian hill farmers, who have had special problems since they were hit by Chernobyl fallout.''

Share this story:

We want to hear, did we miss an angle we should have covered? Should we come back to this topic? Or just give us a rating for this story. We want to hear from you.

Loading...

Loading...

Loading...