A Yugoslav's delightful game in rarefied New York play

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The most prestigious chess event held in New York since the great International Tournament of 1924 took place April 22 through May 4 at the Casa de Espana, a Spanish government cultural center. More than 60 high-ranked players from all over the world competed for the $50,000 prize fund, with Grandmaster Roman Dzindzichashvili of Corona, N.Y., capturing the $18,000 first prize, a US record.

The tournament was tailored along the lines of Louis Statham's Internationals , a popular annual event held in Lone Pine, Calif., from 1971 to 1981 and restricted to top-rated players. The chief sponsor and organizer was Jose Cuchi, a 47-year-old Spaniard who heads Heraldica Imports, a jewelry manufacturing concern. Cosponsors were the American Chess Foundation and the United States Chess Federation.

Cuchi, a strong chess-playing amateur with ''a passion for chess,'' also organized the $105,000 New York Open, which preceded the International.

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Today's game is taken from the first round of the International and features 34-year-old Ljubomir Ljubojevic of Yugoslavia, who was among the leaders throughout the tournament until a last-round loss to Dzindzichashvili dropped him out of the top placings. Ljubojevic is tied with Viktor Korchnoi for the third-highest ranking in the world (after Gary Kasparov and World Champion Anatoly Karpov), and the way he dispatches US International Master Tim Taylor is guaranteed to delight all but the most jaded of chess players.

Sicilian Defense Ljubojevic Taylor Ljubojevic Taylor 1. P-K4 P-QB4 15. N-Q5 (b) NxN 2. N-KB3 N-QB3 16. RxN BxB 3. P-Q4 PxP 17. QxB P-QN4 (c) 4. NxP N-KB3 18. QxBP B-K3 5. N-QB3 P-Q3 19. Q-Q2 (d) Q-R5 6. B-KN5 P-K3 20. P-QN3 QxP 7. Q-Q2 B-K2 21. B-B3 Q-R2 (e) 8. O-O-O O-O 22. RxQP QR-B1 (f) 9. P-B4 NxN 23. P-KN4 (g) P-QR4 (h) 10.QxN P-QR3 (a) 24. R-K1 P-R5 (i) 11. B-K2 Q-R4 25.B-K4 Q-R1 12. K-N1 P-R3 26. RxB (j) PxR 13. B-R4 P-K4 27. Q-Q7 QR-K1 (k) 14. Q-B2 PxP 28. B-N6 Resigns (l)

A. Somewhat more usual is 10. . . . Q-R4, which is most forcefully answered by 11. B-B4. The text is an attempt to improve by meeting 11. B-B4 with 11. . . . P-N4 (also see Note C.)

B. A frequent theme in positions of this type. After the ensuing exchanges, White will have strong pressure on the Black queen pawn, but the White king pawn is also isolated and weak. Often the positions of the kings are what will ultimately decide.

C. Another point of Black's 10. . . . P-QR3, instead of an immediate 10. . . . Q-R4, is to play the more aggressive text rather than have to retreat his queen.

D. This fine move had to be foreseen by White. Now if Black trades queens, his QP would prove indefensible.

E. This abject retreat is made in hopes of obtaining counterplay on the QB file.

F. Now Black threatens 23. . . . RxP; 24. QxR, B-B4, which would lose a piece if Black had played 21. . . . Q-N3.

G. Preventing 23. . . . RxP, but also spinning a web to confine the Black queen.

H. Or the pawn would be lost.

I. But this is tantamount to resignation. For better or worse Black had to try 24. . . . Q-N3; 25. B-Q5, QR-Q1 (not 25. . . . QxP; 26. RxB!); 26. BxB, RxR, and although White should win with a pawn plus in the endgame, Black could still offer resistance.

J. The coup de grace; Black is given no time to regroup.

K. Equally unavailing were 27. . . . QR-Q1; 28. QxKP ch, R-B2; 29. B-N6, R-KB 1; 30. R-KB1 and 27. . . . P-KN4; 28. QxP ch, R-B2 (28. . . . K-N2; 29. Q-N6 mate); 29. QxR(B8) ch.

L. A ludicrous final position. The Black queen is reduced to the role of spectator and even deprives her king of his only possible exit square.

International Grandmaster Arthur Bisguier is a former US champion, has won or shared the US Open title five times, and has captured virtually every other major tournament in this country at least once during more than three decades of competition.

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