Skip to: Content
Skip to: Site Navigation
Skip to: Search


A reading list for teachers too

By Cynthia ParsonsEducation editor of The Christian Science Monitor / May 11, 1981



Boston

Pupils are not the only ones who should do a great deal of out-of-school reading. So should teachers. Following are five books teachers and administrators might read (or reread) in the next seven months.

Skip to next paragraph

Perhaps parent groups could help see that multiple copies are available in teachers' lounges and hold monthly meetings where the ideas in the books are discussed by both teachers and parents.

Also, both town and school librarians might put these books on reserve and help circulate them among educators in the community.

The first book on the list should help those who teach children have a better understanding of the world's most populous continent; the second calls for a profound reshaping of education to address global concerns. The third introduces the neophyte to the world of the silicon chip -- the computer.

The final two books in this short reading list deal with how people of differing races think about and treat each other.All are available in paperback.

Dynasty, by Robert S. Elegant (Fawcett Crest).

Toward the 21st Century: Education for a Changing World, by Edwin O. Reischauer (Random House).

Microcomputers and the 3 R's: A Guide for Teachers, by Christie Doerr (Hayden).

Invisible Man, by Ralph Ellison (Random House).

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, by Mark Twain (Penguin; also Amsco School).

Next week: On co operation