Kenya's President Moi cracks down on corruption in government

By , Special to The Christian Science Monitor

Faced with personal feuds, divisions in his administration, and corruption, Kenya's President Daniel arap Moi has appointed a committee to draw up a "code of conduct" for ministers, members of parliament, and public servants.

The code is to embrace President Moi's philosophy of "peace, love, and unity, " and will apply without exception to everybody in the administration. Anyone violating the code will be removed from office immediately, and thorough knowledge of the code is to be a mandatory prerequisite for anybody who aspires to a position of leadership in the country.

President Moi enunciated this at a conference he called in Nairobi of all the country's top leaders -- ministers, MPs, top public servants, the Army, police, and others. Observes here say it may be the first time a national leader has ever taken such action to create better discipline in his own administration.

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The President's action comes at a time when the Kenyan economy, burdened by rising oil prices, is taking a steep downward turn and forcing cuts in development projects and social services.

In speech to the closed conference, President Moi warned leaders who think their support is indispensable to him "to amend their ways before it is too late." He said there were some who were saying his approach of reconciliation and tolerance was based on the feeling that without the support of the individuals concerned he would not be able to govern.

"I shall not tolerate such individuals or such attitudes in my government -- I know who the individuals are as well as their strategies," he stated. "Frankly I am somewhat disappointed with the performance of some of you as leaders. There is too much bickering among you. There are clear signs that we are not as strongly united as we should be. Each of you professes to be with me , yet you are unable to work together."

He warned again that "those who do not feel able to give 100 percent of their loyalty and dedication, be they ministers or public servants, should leave."

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